Modern Systems announced that the State of Utah has partnered with the legacy modernization leader to transform and modernize its Department of Health and Medicaid support applications.

The objectives of the project are two-fold: To migrate Medicaid application processing from an IBM mainframe environment to a Web-based environment without interrupting the business and minimally impacting end-users. The second objective is to migrate the application's production data to a server-based relational database that maintains the data in the same formats and values.

Modern Systems plans to move the Medicaid applications written in VSAM, COBOL, Assembler, CICS, JCL Procs and Easytrieve from the existing mainframe to a modernized application, converting the application to Java running on Linux with an Oracle database.

The project was awarded following Modern Systems' successful assessment of the State's application environment nine months ago, which resulted in Modern Systems being the sole source contractor for both the assessment and conversion.

Modern Systems was awarded the contract based on the following credentials:

  • Comprehensive assessment of the State's Department of Health and Medicaid legacy application environment
  • In-depth technical knowledge of Modern Systems' subject matter experts, particularly in relation to highly transactional databases and complex conversions
  • Relevant successes with similar customers with regard to COBOL to Java conversions
  • Knowledge and expertise of state government's unique IT and modernization challenges
  • A fixed-bid contract option to ensure accountability of every dollar

"We are proud to be awarded this important project for the State of Utah," said Cameron Jenkins, executive vice president of Modern Systems. "Once complete, this legacy application conversion will enable the State to reduce risks and costs, increase productivity, and take advantage of elastic IT capabilities for the future. The Department of Health and Medicaid support system applications we are converting are critically important as they enable healthcare coverage as needed for the more than three million residents of Utah."